Archive | February 2009

In Praise of Podcasting, by Sandra Beck, Motherhood Incorporated

by Sandra Beck

in praise of podcasts by sandra beck, motherhood incorporated

in praise of podcasts by sandra beck, motherhood incorporated

In Praise of Podcasts by Sandra Beck, Motherhood IncorporatedIn praise of podcasts A plethora of cliches often signposts a kernel of truth. Take your pick: women are good at multitasking; there aren’t enough hours in the day; I feel torn in two. Time is tight if you’re juggling motherhood and working. Add in any vague ambitions at maintaining broader interests or world awareness – and you’re stuffed, aren’t you? I laugh at the idea of old me, feet up, reading the newspaper. I used to enjoy settling down with a good non-ficton book to really get myself informed on an issue. My friends and I debating over black coffee and pastries – we could have been in Paris. For me, podcasts are an amazing shortcut. Simply browse, pick the ones that interest you, and subscribe to them. That ensures that I always have the latest edition on my iPod. I always have an ear in when I commute. I’ve been known to stay listening if I’m walking with the buggy. It gives me an hour each day out of nowhere, that very nearly meets the definition of ‘me time’, At least, I feel a little more like ‘me’ if I can make informed contributions to conversations. Being a London fan. I’m a big fan of BBC output. However, the real joy of the podcast can be in its accessibility to the amateur broadcaster. A high rated contributor on a podcast directory can often combine reasonable ‘listenable’ production values with some sharp commentary that the mainstream networks wouldn’t dare broadcast. I think that this anarchist iconoclast edge takes me back to my student days. We all know how seductive it is to feel young again. For Christmas, we got a radio which can be connected to an MP3 player. Now the kids are getting into podcasts too. They enjoy all the songs and jokes from their favorite characters, without needing to be glued to the TV. I thought I was being especially clever when I put a ‘tidy up song mix’ on my iPod. The kids loved it – they twirl and dance while I’m crouched on the floor picking up the toys. Never mind. Some interesting sites to browse: http://www.podcastblaster.com/directory/ http://www.podanza.com/podcasts/kids/ http://www.motherhoodincorporated.com

In Praise of Podcasts, by Sandra Beck, Motherhood Incorporated

by Sandra Beck

In Praise of Podcasts by Sandra Beck, Motherhood Incorporated

In Praise of Podcasts by Sandra Beck, Motherhood Incorporated

In praise of podcasts  A plethora of cliches often signposts a kernel of truth. Take your pick: women are good at multitasking; there aren’t enough hours in the day; I feel torn in two. Time is tight if you’re juggling motherhood and working. Add in any vague ambitions at maintaining broader interests or world awareness – and you’re stuffed, aren’t you?   I laugh at the idea of old me, feet up, reading the newspaper. I used to enjoy settling down with a good non-ficton book to really get myself informed on an issue. My friends and I debating over black coffee and pastries – we could have been in Paris.  For me, podcasts are an amazing shortcut. Simply browse, pick the ones that interest you, and subscribe to them. That ensures that I always have the latest edition on my iPod.  I always have an ear in when I commute. I’ve been known to stay listening if I’m walking with the buggy. It gives me an hour each day out of nowhere, that very nearly meets the definition of ‘me time’, At least, I feel a little more like ‘me’ if I can make informed contributions to conversations.   Being a London fan. I’m a big fan of BBC output. However, the real joy of the podcast can be in its accessibility to the amateur broadcaster. A high rated contributor on a podcast directory can often combine reasonable ‘listenable’ production values with some sharp commentary that the mainstream networks wouldn’t dare broadcast. I think that this anarchist iconoclast edge takes me back to my student days. We all know how seductive it is to feel young again.  For Christmas, we got a radio which can be connected to an MP3 player. Now the kids are getting into podcasts too. They enjoy all the songs and jokes from their favorite characters, without needing to be glued to the TV.   I thought I was being especially clever when I put a ‘tidy up song mix’ on my iPod. The kids loved it – they twirl and dance while I’m crouched on the floor picking up the toys. Never mind.  Some interesting sites to browse:   http://www.podcastblaster.com/directory/ http://www.podanza.com/podcasts/kids/

www.motherhoodincorporated.com

The Last Month of Pregnancy and the Dread of Nursing My New Baby – By Nicole Perkins

By Nicole Perkins

Between the aching hips, violent heartburn and general exhaustion of being pregnant with my third child, I have to find time to keep the house running. Insert howls of laughter here.

My family’s been really great – my husband tries to do things the way he thinks I want them done, but still just doesn’t understand that a kitchen isn’t really clean until the sink and counters have been wiped down. I’m trying to let go and I love him even more for trying.

Even the kids are trying really hard to be helpful. I made them a sticker chart and after 10 stickers, they get a prize – nothing fancy, just dollar store junk – and I am blown away at how fast they try to get those stickers. Anything that requires bending over has become their thing and they are now happy to do it and look for things they can do to earn those stickers.

Now if only I can feel ready for this baby. All my repressed memories are starting to resurface and I’m getting scared. As I start to write this I realize that most of that fear revolves around nursing.

I did it for four months with my daughter, but barely three with my son. I’ve read all the books, have all the support in the world, but between the cracking, engorging, wondering if they get enough, wondering if I make enough, pumping, watching what I eat/drink – I dread the whole song and dance of breastfeeding more than anything.

I remember being blown away with my daughter by all the stress and insecurity that it brought. I thought it would be easier with my second child, but it was harder. Maybe I’ll get lucky this time and everything will fall in place, but I’m not getting my hopes up.

I’ll do it because it’s the best thing for my baby, and I’ll try for as long as I can as with the other two, but I am definitely not looking forward to it. And maybe I’m psyching myself out, but I am not a quitter and I’ll give it another shot. I blame National Geographic for making it look so easy!

Mom-In-Chief Book Review by Sandra Beck, Motherhood Incorporated

As working mothers, we are always on the lookout for new tips, tricks and techniques to get us through the day.  Recently, I read  Mom-in-Chief by Jamie Woolf.  Jamie relates a story about a SWA (Southwest Airlines)  customer service rep named Kim. Jamie is a leadeship consultant. ahhh…Southwest Airlines – a company I use often and have adored since I wrote a graduate thesis on them many years ago about their Love Coupons.  So the books talks about how  to delegate to children. I try to delegate – I have experience in delegation and the corporate level and a certificate on my wall that claims I am a master of negotiation.  You would think I could get my kids to do things, but I can’t.   Or at least I couldn’t.  Jamie in the book played a game with her kids to get the house in order after coming home from work and finding herself stretched for time.  She pretended her house was an airplane and her son was the pilot and her daughter I forget what she was (she should have been the pilot – this is 2009) but anyway I digress. At the end, the kids were picking up their toys and helping her get ready much faster and with much less stress than she could have on her own.  I found this to be a great way to get the kids involved and tried it with my own kids.  I have to vary the game – just like the race to pick up the toys gets old – but I find that we have been using the idea of setting up an imaginary situation to get the kids to do what I need them to do — some ideas we came up with have been The Great Train Race, The Martians are coming,  and Stinky Pete is Coming to Stink up your clothes (better get them in the hamper!).  She goes on in the book about  leadership and what to delegate and what to delay.   Its a good book to read with some handy ideas and the first book published by Working Mother magazine imprint.    

Mom-in-Chief

Our H-Factor by Lisa Kamen of What is Your Happiness. Com

The words change, instability, insecurity, and unpredictability describe the low-res-1dynamic state of affairs in our world today.  Nothing is what it used to be or what we thought it would be.  As we look towards tomorrow, what world do we envision for ourselves?  We find that we are staring into a gray zone.  We are scrambling to find our footing on ground that seems to be crumbling beneath our feet.  We have conflicting emotions of hope and fear about what tomorrow will bring, but we have no idea what that day will look like.

In the face of this tremendous time of change, we find that within ourselves we are undergoing massive reconstruction as well.  As the world around us falls apart, it forces us to take a long, hard look inside.  What do we find within ourselves that can provide us with some sense of stability and the confidence to ride out these challenges?  What gives us the gumption to get out of bed each day and face the unknown difficulties that the day is sure to bring?  And when these hurdles are ongoing over the long term, when there are no easy answers and no easy way out, how do we find a way to persevere?

If we are to maintain our sanity during this era of great insecurity, we are forced to find something that provides some sort of security we can hold on to. All we can really hold onto is the moment we are experiencing. The present moment…this moment…now…is all that is certain. The past has passed. The future is a possibility. Yet, it is only in this moment we can determine our reality and behavior. It is human nature to reach for something that we believe we can control.  We reach for something within ourselves that no one else can take away.  We make a decision that no matter what life dishes up, we are going to be happy.  We discover our H-Factor.  We also have the revelation that our happiness has always been and will always be under our express control.  Happiness is, after all, a simple choice.  Happiness really doesn’t have much to do with external circumstances.  Happiness is an internal state of being.

To learn more about H-Factor, visit www.whatisyourhappiness.com .

Teaching Your Kids Responsability by Susan A. Haid, Lily's Truth

by Susan A. Haid

How long of a tether do you keep on your kids? The struggle for authority is an age-old dilemma. Who chooses? How much authority should we give our kids? Freedom is something we all need, yet how do we structure our lives so that we get what we need and our children have the appropriate setting in which to make their own choices, learn and grow?
As long as our kids are at home with us, there is a safety net beneath them. Certainly we want the most for our children. We want them to surpass our goals and achieve ones of their own. So we want them to grow. We want them to face challenges. As parents, where do we begin? How do we know what is appropriate, and how do we know exactly what our kids need to do to learn responsibility? This is a nagging question, and although there is no easy way through the parenting process, there are certain basic things we can do to help our kids become responsible adults.

Here are 5 basic strategies to help kids learn the basics:

1. Help kids develop knowledge of themselves and appreciation of their individuality. We must give our kids the freedom to choose which activities and interests they wish to explore. It is our job to facilitate their discovery of their individual and very personal interests by listening to who they are and what they tell us. This means we do not impose our interests and ideas upon them. After offering to them various different opportunities, we accept and support their choices without judgment.

2. Help kids take ownership of their choices. We need to look at every experience our kids have as an opportunity to cultivate self-understanding. This means that when our kids make choices for themselves, they learn to evaluate the consequences without judgment from us. This gives them time to figure out certain life lessons for themselves within the parameter of a safe setting. This is far more impactful that mere rhetoric from us. We are here to listen and offer support during this process. It is a tremendously valuable experience to let our kids make reasonable choices cradled within the opportunity to start over when things don’t turn out as anticipated.

3. Help kids learn how to manage their time. As parents, we help our kids to do this by setting forth our expectations of their responsibilities for the day (homework, athletic or music practice, chores etc.) and then allowing them to accomplish their duties independently, of course with a gentle reminder or two along the way. There should be reasonable consequences in place for failure to accomplish general expectations.

4. Help kids to accept their feelings without judgment. This starts with our ability to accept our own feelings without judgment. Our kids observe how we accept, experience and appropriately express our feelings. This gives them the standard for accepting and expressing their own feelings. Then, we must give our kids the space to appropriately feel their feelings without judgment. This gives our kids the beautiful knowledge about how to take responsibility for their own feelings when they are in a safe space to do so.

5. Help our kids to set their goals for the day, weeks or months ahead. We must set aside some time to listen to what our kids are hoping to experience in the days, week and months ahead. This gives us the opportunity to discuss what might be possible for our child to accomplish and experience with our help and support. This helps our kids learn how to take charge of their life by actively pursuing their developing interests by making them become a reality.

Setting forth strict and uncompassionate guidelines deprives our kids of their ultimate authority in the long run. Conversely, setting forth no guidelines whatsoever undermines the development of a child’s sense of authority and mastery over their life.
Let kids see the results of their own choices. Let them hear the impact of their own words. They must be able to experiment with the world before them.

Part 2 of this article coming soon! In the meantime, for more information about conscious parenting, or for more information about Susan A. Haid and Lily’s Truth, visit http://www.lilystruth.com.

What's Your Truth, by Susan Haid, Lily's Truth

by Susan Haid
The term “truth” is an ambiguous term, its meaning derived from some source other than our own. We believe in “the truth” as it is defined by others. We believe it, we buy off on it, and we live by it without ever considering whether or not we truly agree with it. This brand of truth is often couched in a framework that is offered within books, institutions, religions, colleges and so forth. But it is not our own. We claim it as our own truth, and we believe it belongs to everyone. The truth as we experience it through external sources has a way of seeping through our skin and melding into our hearts thus becoming our own. At least, we believe in it as our own highest truth for the time being.
But let’s begin again. First, let’s re-educate ourselves about the real meaning of trust. Trust begins within ourselves you see. Trust begins with knowledge of self rather than knowledge that we derive from outside sources. Do we implicitly trust our own thoughts, ideas, feelings, and beliefs? Or do we disregard our inner wisdom instead turning to information that originates from somewhere else? Have we lost touch with our own inner navigational equipment because, as we search outside of ourselves for answers, we do not see any role models of people living from that place of exquisite trust of self and the grand knowledge that comes from within? Curiously, what do we think Jesus, Buddha and Krishna were doing to find enlightenment? Instead, we go on allowing ourselves to base our beliefs on old, conventional knowledge because this is what is acceptable, popular, and gosh, it sure is hard to be different.
What are we afraid of by stepping into our own truth? Are we afraid of rejection? Ridicule? Condemnation? Yes. Yet, as we take that bold step into the great pool of wisdom that comes from within, a miraculous transformation happens. We find that when we make this connection to our inner resources, we are able to find a solution for almost anything we need. But you would have to experience this to believe it. I dare you to try.
Can we trust that which comes from our own inner landscape? Can we acknowledge that there are resources within each one of us, the source of which stems far beyond our ego and our human mind. This is a stretch for some who deny that the possibility of this even exists. For some, this will be a challenge, yet I stress that it is the human ego that creates the blocks that resist this understanding. Within each one of us, there is a basic urge to find truth. We search outwardly for signs that we can trust our tools and resources that come from within. Yet, in our search, we find that the basic information is not there because we are referenced to sources “higher” than our own innate wisdom. The knowledge is not there in outer guides because this higher power is not “out there” rather it is “in you”. We wrestle with this idea because we have many long, hard centuries of conditioning behind us that has led us to believe we are not in control of our lives and our destiny.
I see that the dark night is passing and it is the dawn of a new day. The change that I speak of is a day that we proclaim the wisdom, the knowledge, the impetus for change is right here, right now if we choose it because it comes from within ourselves.
I hope to see the day when we are encouraged to trust God Within. The most divine and miraculous resources are right there inside of us if only we knew it and would trust it, and indeed, if we would even look there to begin with. Can we honor and trust this aspect of ourselves that wishes to come forth and stand in all its glory? Can we respect that part of us that is willing to step outside of old ideas and propose new concepts that direct our future in ways no one has seen or heard of? Can we be so bold to hear our own words come forth setting a new path and new ways for others so that they too can hear their own voices from within? We set the tone, and those who are in hearing range will hear our song. This new dawn is long overdue.
The amazing truth is, as we do the work to cultivate trust of our inner world, false beliefs fall away. False beliefs fall away without judgment or fear. What gently steps into authority is understanding, compassion and the discovery of wisdom that is beyond compare. This kind of wisdom is infinite and ever-expansive. However, the only road to get there is the road within yourself.
Now, the only question that remains is this, are you ready? I dare you to try.

For more information about inner truth, visit http://www.lilystruth.com for more exciting information. What’s Your Truth? Take the Journey…