Tag Archive | choose a specialty

Career Focus: Work at Home as a Virtual Assistant by Sandra Beck, Motherhood Incorporated

  by Sandra Beck, Motherhood Incorporated

 

You’ve worked in an office for years.  You’re good at your job, but dread the morning commute.  You long for a flexible schedule that works with your family needs, not against them.  If this sounds like you, you could work at home as a virtual assistant.  Virtual assistants provide administrative services to their clients via the Internet.  Though not required, experience as an administrative assistant can be helpful. AdirondackSchirs

 

The Technology

 

To work out of your home, you will need a telephone line, personal computer, printer, and Internet access.  A fax machine is also helpful.  If you would rather not invest in a fax machine, try an online fax service.  For a monthly fee, you can send and receive faxes by email.

 

Certification

 

Some virtual assistants find certification helpful in keeping their skills at peak performance.  The skills improved upon through certification include executive support, business decision-making, customer service, and project management.  Certification is also helpful in gaining credibility among your colleagues, and potential clients.  Try vacertification.com for more info on becoming certified.

 

Pump Up Your Resumé

 

Is your resume looking a little thin in the experience category?  If you are willing to volunteer your time, you can quickly gain the experience you need to succeed.  There are a number of websites available to connect you with a nonprofit organization in need of your skills.  Try idealist.org, volunteer.gov, or volunteermatch.org.  Beneficial to your career and the charitable cause of your choosing, this match is a win-win situation.  Work hard and you will likely accumulate some professional references as well.

 

Choosing a Niche

 

Once you have established yourself as a virtual assistant, you may want to consider choosing an area of specialization.   Most virtual assistants choose to specialize in a field of interest, such as real estate or medical transcription.  Make the most of your expertise and interests when choosing a niche market.  Specializing will help you gain credibility with your clients.  Over time, you will become an expert in your field, all from the comfort of your own home. 

 

 

Sources:

(2007). The Media’s Virtual Assistant Survey Results.  Retrieved March 7, 2009 from VA Networking Website:

http://www.vanetworking.com/survey/virtual-assistant-statistics.htm.

 

(2004). Virtual Assistant Skill set.  Retrieved March 7, 2009 from Virtual Assistant Certification Website:   http://www.vacertification.com/skillset.htm

www.sandrabeck.com

www.motherhoodincorporated.com

 

 

 

Career Focus: Work at Home as a Virtual Assistant by Sandra Beck, Motherhood Incorporated

  by Sandra Beck, Motherhood Incorporated

 

You’ve worked in an office for years.  You’re good at your job, but dread the morning commute.  You long for a flexible schedule that works with your family needs, not against them.  If this sounds like you, you could work at home as a virtual assistant.  Virtual assistants provide administrative services to their clients via the Internet.  Though not required, experience as an administrative assistant can be helpful. Buntstifte

 

The Technology

 

To work out of your home, you will need a telephone line, personal computer, printer, and Internet access.  A fax machine is also helpful.  If you would rather not invest in a fax machine, try an online fax service.  For a monthly fee, you can send and receive faxes by email.

 

Certification

 

Some virtual assistants find certification helpful in keeping their skills at peak performance.  The skills improved upon through certification include executive support, business decision-making, customer service, and project management.  Certification is also helpful in gaining credibility among your colleagues, and potential clients.  Try vacertification.com for more info on becoming certified.

 

Pump Up Your Resumé

 

Is your resume looking a little thin in the experience category?  If you are willing to volunteer your time, you can quickly gain the experience you need to succeed.  There are a number of websites available to connect you with a nonprofit organization in need of your skills.  Try idealist.org, volunteer.gov, or volunteermatch.org.  Beneficial to your career and the charitable cause of your choosing, this match is a win-win situation.  Work hard and you will likely accumulate some professional references as well.

 

Choosing a Niche

 

Once you have established yourself as a virtual assistant, you may want to consider choosing an area of specialization.   Most virtual assistants choose to specialize in a field of interest, such as real estate or medical transcription.  Make the most of your expertise and interests when choosing a niche market.  Specializing will help you gain credibility with your clients.  Over time, you will become an expert in your field, all from the comfort of your own home. 

 

 

Sources:

(2007). The Media’s Virtual Assistant Survey Results.  Retrieved March 7, 2009 from VA Networking Website:

http://www.vanetworking.com/survey/virtual-assistant-statistics.htm.

 

(2004). Virtual Assistant Skill set.  Retrieved March 7, 2009 from Virtual Assistant Certification Website:   http://www.vacertification.com/skillset.htm

www.sandrabeck.com

www.motherhoodincorporated.com

 

Career Focus: Work at Home as a Grant Writer by Sandra Beck, Motherhood Incorporated

 by Sandra Beck, Motherhood Incorporated

 

 Are you a strong writer with a keen eye for detail?  Do you enjoy research?  Then grant writing may be the work-at-home career for you.  Grant writing doesn’t require an expensive education, though strong writing and grammar skills are a must.  Grant writers must also be comfortable with the financial aspects of business.  If you’ve got the skills, why not try out this flexible, family friendly career?

 The big picture

The Technology

 

Equip your home office with a telephone line, fax, and computer with Internet access, and you will be ready to work.  If you don’t want to invest in a fax machine and second phone line, consider using an online fax service.  For a nominal fee, you can send and receive faxes via email. 

 

Getting Started

 

It is easy to gain experience and familiarity with the grant writing process, if you are willing to work free of charge.  There are many nonprofit organizations looking for grant writing volunteers.  A quick search of the web will turn up plenty of opportunities.  Idealist.org and VolunteerMatch.org both match willing volunteers with nonprofits organizations in need.  Developing needed career skills is even more fulfilling when you are helping out a cause you care for. 

 

Build a Portfolio

 

Keep track of the grants that you have written and record any awards gained by your hard work.  Potential employers will want to know that your work produces results, and in grant writing that adds up to more than just writing samples.  A proven record of success will keep the clients knocking on your door.

 

Choosing a Niche

 

Once you have built an impressive resume, you may find it beneficial to choose a niche or specialty.  If you have background in medicine or education, then that may be the market for you.  If you enjoy helping a worthy cause, specializing in the nonprofit sector may make for a gratifying career.  Whichever area of expertise you choose, capitalize on your strengths and interests.  Specializing will help you gain credibility with your clients.  If you are willing to put in the time and effort, you too can enjoy the flexibility of working at home as a grant writer.

 

www.sandrabeck.com

www.motherhoodincorporated.com

 

Career Focus: Work at Home as a Grant Writer by Sandra Beck, Motherhood Incorporated

by Sandra Beck, Motherhood Incorporated

 

Are you a strong writer with a keen eye for detail?  Do you enjoy research?  Then grant writing may be the work-at-home career for you.  Grant writing doesn’t require an expensive education, though strong writing and grammar skills are a must.  Grant writers must also be comfortable with the financial aspects of business.  If you’ve got the skills, why not try out this flexible, family friendly career?Urban lifestyle in Back Bay, Boston

 

The Technology

 

Equip your home office with a telephone line, fax, and computer with Internet access, and you will be ready to work.  If you don’t want to invest in a fax machine and second phone line, consider using an online fax service.  For a nominal fee, you can send and receive faxes via email. 

 

Getting Started

 

It is easy to gain experience and familiarity with the grant writing process, if you are willing to work free of charge.  There are many nonprofit organizations looking for grant writing volunteers.  A quick search of the web will turn up plenty of opportunities.  Idealist.org and VolunteerMatch.org both match willing volunteers with nonprofits organizations in need.  Developing needed career skills is even more fulfilling when you are helping out a cause you care for. 

 

Build a Portfolio

 

Keep track of the grants that you have written and record any awards gained by your hard work.  Potential employers will want to know that your work produces results, and in grant writing that adds up to more than just writing samples.  A proven record of success will keep the clients knocking on your door.

 

Choosing a Niche

 

Once you have built an impressive resume, you may find it beneficial to choose a niche or specialty.  If you have background in medicine or education, then that may be the market for you.  If you enjoy helping a worthy cause, specializing in the nonprofit sector may make for a gratifying career.  Whichever area of expertise you choose, capitalize on your strengths and interests.  Specializing will help you gain credibility with your clients.  If you are willing to put in the time and effort, you too can enjoy the flexibility of working at home as a grant writer.

 

www.sandrabeck.com

www.motherhoodincorporated.com