Tag Archive | working from home

Boogie Nights with the Kids, by Susan A. Haid, Lily's Truth

  by  Susan A. Haid/ Lily’s Truth

Available at Target and other online local Retailers.

Available at Target and other online local Retailers.

A few months ago, I purchased a multi-colored, rotating disco ball lamp for my kids. My intent was to have some fun from time to time dancing with my kids. What has surprised me is this: the addition of this tacky, retro-style lamp to my family room decor has turned our TV-dominated evenings into Boogie Nights.

My kids are 4, 8 and 11 years old. When I initially plugged in the “ball”, of course, I was the only one dancing for the first ten minutes.  My kids glared at me like I was the weirdest mom on Planet Earth.  Then, one child couldn’t resist the urge to move…then the next…and the next.  Soon, we were shaking, lurching, rocking, and bopping like it was 1999.  Since then, my kids have not stopped shaking their booties. We dance every day, at least once, sometimes more.   We have fun, we laugh, we  move it, move it. Try it and see the effects of this simple, no rules approach to joyfulness.

Can you imagine dancing with your parents when you were a kid? This is a memory I am thrilled my children will have to cherish. I will cherish it too, more than words can express.

These Boogie Days and Boogie Nights provide a beautiful, healthy example of liberation to our children. Moving the body frees the spirit, not through discipline or structure but rather through free expression. Free Expression.  Let those words sink in…

I want to raise my children to be free of repression. I want to raise my children to be wildly creative. I want my children to have the the outrageous courage to think outside the box. I want my children to know that every day there is time for joy.

So, for the rest of our lives, my kids and I will be dancing like the stars in our little family room. We won’t be waiting for a party, or a wedding, or a night out to do the wild thing.

By the time you read this, I’ll be workin’ it with my kids, or maybe even by myself.  It doesn’t matter. It’s a happy thing…cut loose…try it.  Have you watched your kids dance lately?  It’s pretty entertaining.  You won’t be able to wipe the smile off your face.  I guarantee it.

For more tips and tools for parents, visit www.lilystruth.com where you will find cutting edge, New Energy concepts in parenting.

No Wonder They Call It Work by Sandra Beck, Motherhood Incorporated

by Sandra Beck, Motherhood Incorporated

 

 Most of us have considered the upsides to working from home, setting your own schedule, no commute, working in your favorite robe and slippers (if you so choose).  But working at home has its downside, too.  Working out of your house is no day in the park, it’s work and it can be tough.hammock

 

The Downside to Flexibility

 

Flexibility doesn’t just mean that you get to take off when it’s sunny or spend an afternoon on a field trip.  Flexibility in your working hours also means accomplishing the job, even when you’d rather not work.  Sometimes being flexible requires long hours or spending a good chunk of your weekend finishing a project, with the reward being that you are available to chaperon that field trip after all.

 

Setting Boundaries

 

Being the ‘no’ woman isn’t easy.  When we work in a corporate environment, the boundaries are usually laid out for us.  Company policies are in place to guide us and make our jobs easier.  When we work at home, we are the ones to set and enforce those boundaries.  Whether with our kids, our friends, our employers or clients, we must be willing to draw the line.  If you can’t say no, working from home can quickly become an express train to the burnout zone. 

 

Let the Results Speak for Themselves

 

Discipline and self-motivation are the foundation of any work-at-home career.  If you work from your house, no one knows whether you are working hard, or hardly working, unless they are seeing results.  To be successful you have to be driven to achieve above and beyond what is expected.  A results-oriented attitude will ease the minds of concerned employers, who may be wondering just what it is you are doing in that home office.

 

Independence or Isolation?

 

What one working mother considers independence, another may view as isolation.  After becoming a victim of corporate downsizing, a friend of mine decided to stay home for the summer.  That summer ended in July at her house.  She needed the time away from home during the day. 

 

Sweet Success

 

When it comes down to it, a home-based career can be deeply satisfying.  I love the time I am able to share with my family, and the sense of accomplishment I have at the end of the day.  Overcoming the challenges we face on the job makes each success that much sweeter.

 

www.sandrabeck.com

www.motherhoodincorporated.com

 

No Wonder They Call It Work by Sandra Beck, Motherhood Incorporated

by Sandra Beck, Motherhood Incorporated

 

 Most of us have considered the upsides to working from home, setting your own schedule, no commute, working in your favorite robe and slippers (if you so choose).  But working at home has its downside, too.  Working out of your house is no day in the park, it’s work and it can be tough.Rainbow woman

 

The Downside to Flexibility

 

Flexibility doesn’t just mean that you get to take off when it’s sunny or spend an afternoon on a field trip.  Flexibility in your working hours also means accomplishing the job, even when you’d rather not work.  Sometimes being flexible requires long hours or spending a good chunk of your weekend finishing a project, with the reward being that you are available to chaperon that field trip after all.

 

Setting Boundaries

 

Being the ‘no’ woman isn’t easy.  When we work in a corporate environment, the boundaries are usually laid out for us.  Company policies are in place to guide us and make our jobs easier.  When we work at home, we are the ones to set and enforce those boundaries.  Whether with our kids, our friends, our employers or clients, we must be willing to draw the line.  If you can’t say no, working from home can quickly become an express train to the burnout zone. 

 

Let the Results Speak for Themselves

 

Discipline and self-motivation are the foundation of any work-at-home career.  If you work from your house, no one knows whether you are working hard, or hardly working, unless they are seeing results.  To be successful you have to be driven to achieve above and beyond what is expected.  A results-oriented attitude will ease the minds of concerned employers, who may be wondering just what it is you are doing in that home office.

 

Independence or Isolation?

 

What one working mother considers independence, another may view as isolation.  After becoming a victim of corporate downsizing, a friend of mine decided to stay home for the summer.  That summer ended in July at her house.  She needed the time away from home during the day. 

 

Sweet Success

 

When it comes down to it, a home-based career can be deeply satisfying.  I love the time I am able to share with my family, and the sense of accomplishment I have at the end of the day.  Overcoming the challenges we face on the job makes each success that much sweeter.

 

www.sandrabeck.com

www.motherhoodincorporated.com

 

Career Focus: Work at Home as a Bookkeeper or Accounting Clerk by Sandra Beck, Motherhood Incorporated

Sandra Beck, Motherhood Incorporated

 

Do you enjoy working with numbers?  Do you have an eye for detail?  Bookkeeping may be the work-at-home job for you.   An expensive education is not required.  Most bookkeepers and accounting clerks need a high school diploma, while some professionals advance their careers through a 2-year associate degree.  On-the-job training is common in this field.  Flexible telecommuting options make this career especially family friendly, and a great fit for the work-at-home mother.spring-trees

 

Required Skills

 

A strong aptitude for numbers is a must for bookkeepers and accounting clerks.  Familiarity with computers, word processing software, and spreadsheets is also required.  You must be an organized, detail-oriented person, with an ability to spot and correct errors.  A bookkeeper or accounting clerk must also be trustworthy with a strong sense of ethics, as she will frequently work with confidential information.  Good communication skills are always beneficial.

 

The Technology

 

You will need a computer equipped with a printer, as well as word processing and spreadsheet software to work as a bookkeeper or accounting clerk out of your home.  Basic communication tools, such as a phone line and email address, are also necessary.  Fax capabilities are a plus.  An online fax service may be a viable option for those who do not wish to invest in a fax machine.

 

Getting Started

 

The easiest way to build bookkeeping and accounting skills when you are starting out is to volunteer your time to a nonprofit organization.  There are plenty of organizations looking for bookkeeping and accounting assistance.  Try searching volunteer.gov for local or virtual opportunities.  If you put forth your best effort, a satisfied patron will usually be happy to serve as a reference while you search for a paid position.  

 

Certification

 

The Certified Bookkeeper designation is awarded by the American Institute of Professional Bookkeepers.  Candidates must have at least 2 years of bookkeeping experience, follow a code of ethics, and pass a four-part examination.  Though certification is not necessary to be successful, it will boost your credibility with potential employers.

 

www.sandrabeck.com

www.motherhoodincorporated.com

 

5 Tips To Work-Home Transition Success by Sandra Beck, Motherhood Incorporated

By Sandra Beck, Motherhood Incorporated

 Last weekend I spent some time visiting with family.  My sister’s ten-acre lot has become something of an oasis these days.  The rural atmosphere is a delight for this suburban native, and a much needed source of rest.  As I cuddled with my toddler, tired from our hour-long afternoon hike, I remembered a time when my unwillingness to leave work in the office overshadowed our time together.  When you work at home, like I do, it can be all too easy to slip into an assignment during off hours.flowers1

As I became acclimated to the work-at-home lifestyle, I picked up a few easy techniques to help bring my mind back to the things that matter most at the end of the day.  Here are a few ideas for making the transition from work to home a successful one:

Set a work schedule and stick to it.  When you plan to work a set number of hours, it is easier to prioritize your time.  Once you have a plan in place, be diligent about staying within those boundaries.

Transition by spending time doing something you love.  Set aside some time to journal, blog, read a book, or partake in another hobby after you finish working for the day.  Time spent doing something you enjoy will help get your mind off of the job and ready for a restful evening.

Keep your To Do list accessible.  If a work-related thought begins gnawing at your brain, write it down and leave it for business hours.  You’ll have the reminder you need to get the job done at the appropriate time.

Resolve to power down. Shut down your computer, cell phone and other work-related technology at the end of the day.  Once it’s off, leave it that way!

When all else fails, get out of town.  A weekend getaway or an afternoon with family or friends is a wonderful way to smooth the rough edges left behind by a stressful work week.  You needn’t spend a lot of money to get away, sometimes a family trip to a local park is all that is needed to melt the stress away.

www.sandrabeck.com
www.motherhoodincorporated.com